Tuesday, October 21, 2014

captoring:

nephyria:

"asexuality is just the lack of a sex drive, or a really low one" uuhhh no. really, no. that is incorrect, you have been lied to, i’m sorry.

asexuality is the lack of sexual attraction to anyone. sex drive is your horny meter. you can still be horny and not be sexually attracted to people! similarly you can be sexually attracted to people and not be horny!! amaze

oh my god this actually clarifies so much thank you

Monday, October 20, 2014
lacigreen:

**5 THINGS EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT SLUT SHAME THIS HALLOWEEN**
1. Calling women sluts/whores/skanks is a form of sexism.When it comes to costumes, clothing, and sexual behavior, women are judged by a very different rubric than men.  When a guy has a lot of sex, he’s a stud.  If a woman behaves the same way, she’s a “whore”, “dirty”, “used up”, and doesn’t deserve to be treated with respect.  While people may use terms like “manslut” or “manwhore”, the consequences for the “manwhore” are not nearly as extreme.  People don’t see him as unworthy of respect.  He won’t be degraded, bullied, or have lies and rumors spread about him.  His reputation won’t be destroyed.  Being a “manwhore” is dismissed as him *~just being a guy~*.  
Because slut shame is a result of sexist ideas about what a woman “should” be or is allowed to do/be in the first place, women slut-shaming each other is a form of internalized sexism.  This is where a woman believes sexist things about herself and other women.  It can be very disruptive and harmful to women’s relationships with each other.  
These are some of the ways slut shame is entrenched in sexism.
2. Slut shame limits women’s freedom.Calling women names and degrading them when they *break the rules* about how a woman is SUPPOSED to dress or behave ensures that women don’t have the same freedom men do.  They are not allowed to dress or do what they like…unless they want to pay the price of being bullied or dehumanized for it.
3. Slut shame is one of the ways women compete with each other for male approval.   Slut-shaming creates a divide between women.  There are the “slutty stupid ones” with “no self respect” and there are the “proper ladies” who deserve to be treated as human.  Instead of building women up and cultivating healthy friendships, slut shame turns women against each other so that the slut-shamer can prove she’s “not like that” and therefore worthy of respect.  It puts women into harmful categories based on nothing more than how someone dresses or is perceived by others.  
4. Slut shame is a form of bullying.Girls who break outside the mold of what they are supposed to do/be sexually and are thusly labeled sluts are at a higher risk of anxiety, depression, and suicide.  There have been many suicides that started with bullying in the form of slut shame. RIP Felicia Garcia, Amanda Todd, Phoebe Prince, Hope Witsell, Stacey Rambold’s unnamed victim, and all the other young women who have tragically taken their own lives because of the heartlessness and sexism of their peers.
5. Slut shame leads to rape, sexual assault, and sexual violence.Because people see “sluts” as unworthy of respect, she is therefore not entitled to say no.  In this mentality, “sluts” become a target of harassment, assault, and even rape.  After the violence, she is then blamed for it.  After all, she was just a dumb slut….she asked for it, right?
This Halloween (and always) be a good person.  Respect women, respect their choices, and check yourself when you find yourself thinking or saying someone is a slut.  It’s a deeply held attitude about women that we all learn from our sexist culture, and it is vital that we all take the time to unlearn it.  These attitudes are more vicious and dangerous than they might appear.
xx
Laci

lacigreen:

**5 THINGS EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT SLUT SHAME THIS HALLOWEEN**

1. Calling women sluts/whores/skanks is a form of sexism.
When it comes to costumes, clothing, and sexual behavior, women are judged by a very different rubric than men.  When a guy has a lot of sex, he’s a stud.  If a woman behaves the same way, she’s a “whore”, “dirty”, “used up”, and doesn’t deserve to be treated with respect.  While people may use terms like “manslut” or “manwhore”, the consequences for the “manwhore” are not nearly as extreme.  People don’t see him as unworthy of respect.  He won’t be degraded, bullied, or have lies and rumors spread about him.  His reputation won’t be destroyed.  Being a “manwhore” is dismissed as him *~just being a guy~*.  

Because slut shame is a result of sexist ideas about what a woman “should” be or is allowed to do/be in the first place, women slut-shaming each other is a form of internalized sexism.  This is where a woman believes sexist things about herself and other women.  It can be very disruptive and harmful to women’s relationships with each other.  

These are some of the ways slut shame is entrenched in sexism.

2. Slut shame limits women’s freedom.
Calling women names and degrading them when they *break the rules* about how a woman is SUPPOSED to dress or behave ensures that women don’t have the same freedom men do.  They are not allowed to dress or do what they like…unless they want to pay the price of being bullied or dehumanized for it.

3. Slut shame is one of the ways women compete with each other for male approval.  
Slut-shaming creates a divide between women.  There are the “slutty stupid ones” with “no self respect” and there are the “proper ladies” who deserve to be treated as human.  Instead of building women up and cultivating healthy friendships, slut shame turns women against each other so that the slut-shamer can prove she’s “not like that” and therefore worthy of respect.  It puts women into harmful categories based on nothing more than how someone dresses or is perceived by others.  

4. Slut shame is a form of bullying.
Girls who break outside the mold of what they are supposed to do/be sexually and are thusly labeled sluts are at a higher risk of anxiety, depression, and suicide.  There have been many suicides that started with bullying in the form of slut shame. RIP Felicia Garcia, Amanda Todd, Phoebe Prince, Hope Witsell, Stacey Rambold’s unnamed victim, and all the other young women who have tragically taken their own lives because of the heartlessness and sexism of their peers.

5. Slut shame leads to rape, sexual assault, and sexual violence.
Because people see “sluts” as unworthy of respect, she is therefore not entitled to say no.  In this mentality, “sluts” become a target of harassment, assault, and even rape.  After the violence, she is then blamed for it.  After all, she was just a dumb slut….she asked for it, right?

This Halloween (and always) be a good person.  Respect women, respect their choices, and check yourself when you find yourself thinking or saying someone is a slut.  It’s a deeply held attitude about women that we all learn from our sexist culture, and it is vital that we all take the time to unlearn it.  These attitudes are more vicious and dangerous than they might appear.

xx

Laci

foryoursexualinformation:

transstudent:


Here’s some terminology about gender that many people get wrong! To learn more, go here: www.transstudent.org/gendergrammar


I think this is really good information to know for anyone who was unsure about which words to use.

foryoursexualinformation:

transstudent:

Here’s some terminology about gender that many people get wrong! To learn more, go here: www.transstudent.org/gendergrammar

I think this is really good information to know for anyone who was unsure about which words to use.

Sunday, October 19, 2014
heyepiphora:

Throughout the month of October, get 25% all anal toys at Tantus with code CHEEKY. My favorite plugs are the Ryder (my review), Neo, Juice, and Ripple (my review).

heyepiphora:

Throughout the month of October, get 25% all anal toys at Tantus with code CHEEKY. My favorite plugs are the Ryder (my review), NeoJuice, and Ripple (my review).

interactyouth:

The following intersex FAQ was compiled by the members of Inter/Act. It is intended to be a living document that we will continue to tweak, change, add-to and subtract from. Please feel free to reference it, re-blog it, and ask us questions (on tumblr or at inter.act@aiclegal.org)
What is intersex?
Intersex is an umbrella term that describes people born with intersex conditions or DSD (Differences of Sex Development). There are over 30 different conditions that cause intersex people to have physical differences inside and/or outside their bodies, making their sex neither purely male or female. Biology class has always taught us that sex is merely black and white, “male” or “female,” but now we know that’s not true. There are a lot of awesome gray areas in the middle!
What are some intersex conditions?
There are over many conditions that fall under the intersex umbrella including, but not limited to: Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS), Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Klinefelter Syndrome, Hypospadias, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH), Swyer Syndrome, Turner Syndrome, 5-Alpha Reductase Deficiency. Please see the ISNA (Intersex Society of North America) website for more information on specific conditions.
How common are intersex people?
Intersex people are about 1-2% of the population, or 1 in every 2,000 people. That’s as common as natural born redheads! We’re not rare, just invisible.
So how come I’ve never heard of intersex before?
The intersex community has a long history of shame and secrecy, for so many reasons. For starters, many doctors have told patients that they’ll never meet anyone like themselves. Sometimes they’ll even tell them not to talk about their conditions to anyone! On top of that, doctors and parents often try to “fix” intersex kid’s bodies with unnecessary surgeries, trying to make them fit into their idea of “normal.” Not to mention each condition is different, so educating the general public is hard when there is so much information to talk about.
It sounds like intersex conditions can be hard to care for!
They can be. Finding a good doctor that you can really connect with is so important for intersex people. Sometimes doctors don’t know the best way to handle each specific person. We all need to be informed about our bodies, our options, and the research that’s been done so we can make the best decisions possible. Making an informed decision is the most important thing an intersex person can do, so please don’t rush into anything. 
How does gender fit into intersex?
Not quite as simply as you might think! Intersex relates to biological sex and a person’s genetic traits, internal and external reproductive organs, hormones, and secondary sex characteristics. Gender is more about the way somebody feels or identifies. This means intersex individuals identify as female, male, man, woman, or a multitude of identities just as non-intersex individuals do. Some examples include genderqueer, agender, third gender, two-spirit, and the list doesn’t end there.  It’s important to remember that gender is fluid, not stagnant, possibly alternating its course during a person’s journey 
How does intersex differ from transgender?
Intersex is often confused with transgender, but they are actually very different things. Intersex is when your biological sex doesn’t neatly fit into the male/female binary, but transgender is when you feel as if your assigned sex does not match your gender identity. Someone can be both intersex and transgender!
What terms can I use to talk about intersex people?
Intersex and DSD are the two current terms that most people use interchangeably. However, they both are controversial for different people.  Some of our youth feel more comfortable with DSD as it might be the only term they are familiar with, while others prefer intersex over DSD. All intersex folks have the right to self define themselves at any particular point in their journey. It’s better for people to come to their own conclusions about how they want to identify, rather than be told or pushed into identifying a certain way. If you don’t know how someone identifies, feel free to ask!
Can I use the word hermaphrodite?
No. Hermaphrodite is a harmful term that is widely considered a slur, please don’t use it. It’s a stigmatizing word that people associate with having both sets of working genetalia, which is rarely possible in humans, if at all. Some intersex folk have started reclaiming the term, but that is for them to decide and use, not for you. 
What are some other terms I should know?
Ambiguous Genitalia - Genitalia that doesn’t look clearly “male” or “female.” However, no genitals look the same, and nobody’s genitalia is “ambiguous.” It’s all just genitals!
Dyadic - Some intersex people have started using dyadic to describe those who are not intersex (meaning, they fit the “male” or “female” binary)
Cisgender- When a person’s gender identity matches their assigned sex. For example, a person assigned female at birth and identifies as a woman is considered cisgender. This term can get confusing with intersex individuals - some use it, some don’t.
HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy)  - This is an important tool in an intersex person’s tool box. HRT ensures that an intersex person’s physical and emotional health needs are properly maintained. If someone’s hormone needs (for things like development, body regulation, or bone growth) aren’t being met, they may go on HRT to figure out the best hormone levels for their bodies.
Informed Consent - This term gets thrown a lot, especially when talking about surgeries of intersex people. Basically, it means that nobody should be operated on without their full knowledge of circumstances, repercussions, reasoning, etc. For example, babies and children are too young to fully understand and give informed consent.
Preferred Pronouns - Many people (intersex or otherwise) don’t identify as a binary gender, especially when their bodies don’t line up in a typical binary box. Ask someone what their preferred gender pronoun is. They’ll love you for it!
What are some other intersex resources?
We have an ever-growing list of resources on our page. Please check there for more information on support groups or legal help.
What can you do as an ally?
Call out others when they say harmful things. Be our advocates where you can, but also give us a chance to educate. Don’t speak over an intersex person, as chances are we’re a lot more familiar with these issues than you are. Listen and try to understand our stories, as we’re pretty incredible people. :)

interactyouth:

The following intersex FAQ was compiled by the members of Inter/Act. It is intended to be a living document that we will continue to tweak, change, add-to and subtract from. Please feel free to reference it, re-blog it, and ask us questions (on tumblr or at inter.act@aiclegal.org)

What is intersex?

Intersex is an umbrella term that describes people born with intersex conditions or DSD (Differences of Sex Development). There are over 30 different conditions that cause intersex people to have physical differences inside and/or outside their bodies, making their sex neither purely male or female. Biology class has always taught us that sex is merely black and white, “male” or “female,” but now we know that’s not true. There are a lot of awesome gray areas in the middle!

What are some intersex conditions?

There are over many conditions that fall under the intersex umbrella including, but not limited to: Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS), Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Klinefelter Syndrome, Hypospadias, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH), Swyer Syndrome, Turner Syndrome, 5-Alpha Reductase Deficiency. Please see the ISNA (Intersex Society of North America) website for more information on specific conditions.

How common are intersex people?

Intersex people are about 1-2% of the population, or 1 in every 2,000 people. That’s as common as natural born redheads! We’re not rare, just invisible.

So how come I’ve never heard of intersex before?

The intersex community has a long history of shame and secrecy, for so many reasons. For starters, many doctors have told patients that they’ll never meet anyone like themselves. Sometimes they’ll even tell them not to talk about their conditions to anyone! On top of that, doctors and parents often try to “fix” intersex kid’s bodies with unnecessary surgeries, trying to make them fit into their idea of “normal.” Not to mention each condition is different, so educating the general public is hard when there is so much information to talk about.

It sounds like intersex conditions can be hard to care for!

They can be. Finding a good doctor that you can really connect with is so important for intersex people. Sometimes doctors don’t know the best way to handle each specific person. We all need to be informed about our bodies, our options, and the research that’s been done so we can make the best decisions possible. Making an informed decision is the most important thing an intersex person can do, so please don’t rush into anything.

How does gender fit into intersex?

Not quite as simply as you might think! Intersex relates to biological sex and a person’s genetic traits, internal and external reproductive organs, hormones, and secondary sex characteristics. Gender is more about the way somebody feels or identifies. This means intersex individuals identify as female, male, man, woman, or a multitude of identities just as non-intersex individuals do. Some examples include genderqueer, agender, third gender, two-spirit, and the list doesn’t end there.  It’s important to remember that gender is fluid, not stagnant, possibly alternating its course during a person’s journey

How does intersex differ from transgender?

Intersex is often confused with transgender, but they are actually very different things. Intersex is when your biological sex doesn’t neatly fit into the male/female binary, but transgender is when you feel as if your assigned sex does not match your gender identity. Someone can be both intersex and transgender!

What terms can I use to talk about intersex people?

Intersex and DSD are the two current terms that most people use interchangeably. However, they both are controversial for different people.  Some of our youth feel more comfortable with DSD as it might be the only term they are familiar with, while others prefer intersex over DSD. All intersex folks have the right to self define themselves at any particular point in their journey. It’s better for people to come to their own conclusions about how they want to identify, rather than be told or pushed into identifying a certain way. If you don’t know how someone identifies, feel free to ask!

Can I use the word hermaphrodite?

No. Hermaphrodite is a harmful term that is widely considered a slur, please don’t use it. It’s a stigmatizing word that people associate with having both sets of working genetalia, which is rarely possible in humans, if at all. Some intersex folk have started reclaiming the term, but that is for them to decide and use, not for you.

What are some other terms I should know?

Ambiguous Genitalia - Genitalia that doesn’t look clearly “male” or “female.” However, no genitals look the same, and nobody’s genitalia is “ambiguous.” It’s all just genitals!

Dyadic - Some intersex people have started using dyadic to describe those who are not intersex (meaning, they fit the “male” or “female” binary)

Cisgender- When a person’s gender identity matches their assigned sex. For example, a person assigned female at birth and identifies as a woman is considered cisgender. This term can get confusing with intersex individuals - some use it, some don’t.

HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy)  - This is an important tool in an intersex person’s tool box. HRT ensures that an intersex person’s physical and emotional health needs are properly maintained. If someone’s hormone needs (for things like development, body regulation, or bone growth) aren’t being met, they may go on HRT to figure out the best hormone levels for their bodies.

Informed Consent - This term gets thrown a lot, especially when talking about surgeries of intersex people. Basically, it means that nobody should be operated on without their full knowledge of circumstances, repercussions, reasoning, etc. For example, babies and children are too young to fully understand and give informed consent.

Preferred Pronouns - Many people (intersex or otherwise) don’t identify as a binary gender, especially when their bodies don’t line up in a typical binary box. Ask someone what their preferred gender pronoun is. They’ll love you for it!

What are some other intersex resources?

We have an ever-growing list of resources on our page. Please check there for more information on support groups or legal help.

What can you do as an ally?

Call out others when they say harmful things. Be our advocates where you can, but also give us a chance to educate. Don’t speak over an intersex person, as chances are we’re a lot more familiar with these issues than you are. Listen and try to understand our stories, as we’re pretty incredible people. :)

rileykonor:

A Discussion on “Mandatory Pronouns” vs. “Preferred Pronouns”
Today, I would like to discuss a trend within some of the transgender and gender non-conforming communities that I have noticed lately - and that is the growing dislike of the phrase “preferred pronouns” and the shaming of folks who say things like, “I prefer x/y/z pronouns.”
To some, this phrase “preferred pronouns” somehow gives the impression that folks can decide what pronouns they want to refer to you with or choose how to gender you at any given time, or not be held accountable when they mess up your pronouns. While I understand that the phrase may give that impression and folks can take advantage of that, the term is quite valuable to some in the gender non-conforming communities - especially those with multiple pronouns and/or identities and gender sensitive situations. To me, it is a valid phrase that should be respected among communities who want to use it to describe their personal pronoun use.
As a non-binary person, I have pronouns that I would prefer to be used for me depending on social situations. I have this preference for my own safety and well-being, and I discuss it at length with folks that I feel comfortable with - like friends, family, and some acquaintances. 

For example, I used to identify with he/him/his AND they/them/their pronouns interchangeably. My friends and family were aware of this. They would refer to me as he/him in situations when we were in good company, but in workplace environments or other public situations where I was not completely out as genderqueer, they would try to use gender neutral pronouns - which is what I preferred to avoid awkward or even harmful social situations.
Sidenote: I now only use they/them/their pronouns for myself, but the sentiment is still there. I know a lot of other folks have had similar experiences with this and would like the same respect.

Some people ONLY use binary pronouns: he/him/his or she/her/hers. Some simply use they/them/their or other gender neutral pronouns like ze/zim/zer. Others use a variety of pronouns depending on their situation, gender identity, and gender expression, and this can vary from day to day for some folks.

Bottom line: Pronouns ARE mandatory, but they are not universally used the same ways in the same situations for all people. Pronouns are valid and should be respected and acknowledged according to each person. Trans and gender non-conforming communities are full of diversity, so why can’t we accept that pronouns are mandatory AND/or may be preferred for some?

Personally, I identify with both phrases collectively. My pronouns are mandatory to me. My pronouns pertain to me and are not to be modified or disregarded by anyone but me. But I do have preferences regarding my pronouns in various situations, as I have said. Quite frankly, there are so many factors that would determine what situation(s) would be appropriate to use what pronouns - and not just for me, but for everyone. This is why it is so important to not only inquire about people’s pronouns and their preferences, but also check-in regarding their pronoun status. Communicate when you can. Do research. Ask questions if need be. But respect people’s pronouns.
This is a really basic attempt at discussing this topic and the issues surrounding it. Basically, I wrote this to raise awareness of this issue and just keep the discussion going.
Please feel free to do so.

rileykonor:

A Discussion on “Mandatory Pronouns” vs. “Preferred Pronouns”

Today, I would like to discuss a trend within some of the transgender and gender non-conforming communities that I have noticed lately - and that is the growing dislike of the phrase “preferred pronouns” and the shaming of folks who say things like, “I prefer x/y/z pronouns.”

To some, this phrase “preferred pronouns” somehow gives the impression that folks can decide what pronouns they want to refer to you with or choose how to gender you at any given time, or not be held accountable when they mess up your pronouns. While I understand that the phrase may give that impression and folks can take advantage of that, the term is quite valuable to some in the gender non-conforming communities - especially those with multiple pronouns and/or identities and gender sensitive situations. To me, it is a valid phrase that should be respected among communities who want to use it to describe their personal pronoun use.

As a non-binary person, I have pronouns that I would prefer to be used for me depending on social situations. I have this preference for my own safety and well-being, and I discuss it at length with folks that I feel comfortable with - like friends, family, and some acquaintances. 

For example, I used to identify with he/him/his AND they/them/their pronouns interchangeably. My friends and family were aware of this. They would refer to me as he/him in situations when we were in good company, but in workplace environments or other public situations where I was not completely out as genderqueer, they would try to use gender neutral pronouns - which is what I preferred to avoid awkward or even harmful social situations.

Sidenote: I now only use they/them/their pronouns for myself, but the sentiment is still there. I know a lot of other folks have had similar experiences with this and would like the same respect.

Some people ONLY use binary pronouns: he/him/his or she/her/hers. Some simply use they/them/their or other gender neutral pronouns like ze/zim/zer. Others use a variety of pronouns depending on their situation, gender identity, and gender expression, and this can vary from day to day for some folks.

Bottom line: Pronouns ARE mandatory, but they are not universally used the same ways in the same situations for all people. Pronouns are valid and should be respected and acknowledged according to each person. Trans and gender non-conforming communities are full of diversity, so why can’t we accept that pronouns are mandatory AND/or may be preferred for some?

Personally, I identify with both phrases collectively. My pronouns are mandatory to me. My pronouns pertain to me and are not to be modified or disregarded by anyone but me. But I do have preferences regarding my pronouns in various situations, as I have said. Quite frankly, there are so many factors that would determine what situation(s) would be appropriate to use what pronouns - and not just for me, but for everyone. This is why it is so important to not only inquire about people’s pronouns and their preferences, but also check-in regarding their pronoun status. Communicate when you can. Do research. Ask questions if need be. But respect people’s pronouns.

This is a really basic attempt at discussing this topic and the issues surrounding it. Basically, I wrote this to raise awareness of this issue and just keep the discussion going.

Please feel free to do so.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

wasthataparable:

((The pictures have captions, if you’re into that))

Until a few months ago, I never tracked my menstrual cycle, nor did I know much about it. When I decided to start paying more attention to my cycle, I went through a lot of period-tracking apps, but none of them really appealed to me. I read an article about Clue (I don’t remember where, sorry) when it first came out and decided to give it a try.

Clue is aesthetically pleasing, easy to use, and extremely informative. It is designed to help you better understand your body, and it does a fantastic job.

I love Clue’s visuals because while there is a lovely calendar showing you your logged and estimated period and ovulation, Clue also presents your cycle as a cycle, which is how I’ve always visualized menstruation. Seeing it this way led to a greater understanding of how my cycle works; it starts with “the period” and ends with PMS.

Clue allows you to log your period (light, medium, heavy, or spotting), different types of pain related to your cycle (cramps, headaches, ovulation pain, tender breasts), sexual activity (unprotected, protected, withdrawal method, high sex drive), mood (happy, sensitive, sad, PMS), and cervical fluid (eggwhite, sticky, creamy, atypical). Clue also lets you type in your own notes to keep track of any patterns you notice that Clue doesn’t account for. 

Clue also accounts for the fact that you may not know what some of those terms mean. How do I know what kind of cervical fluid this is? What does each kind mean? What does ovulation pain feel like and why does it happen? Clue answers all of these questions and more. This app not only lets you track your menstrual cycle but also provides you with facts and figures to help you better understand your body (while also reminding you that not all bodies are the same, so take any given information with a grain of salt). Bonus: all of the sources for Clue’s info are given to you in the app.

Lastly, Clue makes it easy to see what your average cycle looks like and explains how they found that average and how they use that average to estimate what your future cycles will look like. The one flaw with this, though, is that if you have an irregular period, the average is gonna be skewed because [insert Period Georg outlier joke here]. 

IN CONCLUSION, Clue is a lovely, informative app for tracking your menstrual cycle and if you find yourself going through a whole bunch of other apps trying to find your One True Period Tracker, give this a try. If you want to find out more, check out their official website and blog. I am in no way affiliated with Clue, but I have been using the app for several months, so if you have any questions, feel free to come to my ask box as well!

fandomsandfeminism:

lollus:

fandomsandfeminism:

lollus:

Hehe equality right?

Do you not understand the purpose of this, or why the prices are what they are? Does this need to be explained to you?

Oh yea right, the famous “wage gap” between men and women that has been debunked tons of times! That sure is the right argument to fight sexism with!

Not debunked, misrepresented, as it is a complicated issue. It’s honestly more accurate to call it a PAY gap than a WAGE gap, since there are a myriad of factors at play here. Women DO, on average, make less money than men. That is indisputable, and the margins widen when you include factors of race, disability, and sexuality. 
Here’s a good starter resource on it. 
IF you would like some more in depth reading:
This one is from Stanford about the Gender Pay Gap
This is a New York Times article looking at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s report on the topic.
This one is from the International Trade Union Confederation 
This one is from Oxford, titled Up the Down Staircase: Women’s Upward Mobility and the Wage Penalty for Occupational Feminization
You can also look at the US Census’s look at the Pay Gap
Or the Institute for Women’s Policy Research
Even the United States Government Accountability Office has some information on it.
So yes, the bake sale above is a pretty simplistic little stunt about a complicated economic and social issue. But the fact that it pisses people off sort of makes its point for it. 

fandomsandfeminism:

lollus:

fandomsandfeminism:

lollus:

Hehe equality right?

Do you not understand the purpose of this, or why the prices are what they are? Does this need to be explained to you?

Oh yea right, the famous “wage gap” between men and women that has been debunked tons of times! That sure is the right argument to fight sexism with!

Not debunked, misrepresented, as it is a complicated issue. It’s honestly more accurate to call it a PAY gap than a WAGE gap, since there are a myriad of factors at play here. Women DO, on average, make less money than men. That is indisputable, and the margins widen when you include factors of race, disability, and sexuality. 

Here’s a good starter resource on it. 

IF you would like some more in depth reading:

This one is from Stanford about the Gender Pay Gap

This is a New York Times article looking at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s report on the topic.

This one is from the International Trade Union Confederation 

This one is from Oxford, titled Up the Down Staircase: Women’s Upward Mobility and the Wage Penalty for Occupational Feminization

You can also look at the US Census’s look at the Pay Gap

Or the Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Even the United States Government Accountability Office has some information on it.

So yes, the bake sale above is a pretty simplistic little stunt about a complicated economic and social issue. But the fact that it pisses people off sort of makes its point for it.